Last edited by Mojind
Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

6 edition of Demographic Trends in the European Region (WHO Regional Publications, European) found in the catalog.

Demographic Trends in the European Region (WHO Regional Publications, European)

by R.L. Cliquet

  • 241 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by WHO Regional Office for Europe .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Personal & public health

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages188
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12948872M
    ISBN 109289011084
    ISBN 109789289011082

    Today’s main demographic developments across Europe 1 are an ageing population, a slowing down of population growth, and decreasing growth rates of the working-age population. These developments are expected to remain the most important demographic challenges in the next decades. Social trends, through the ageing of population, the migratory phenomenon or social cohesion, are key questions for the European Union. The Lisbon strategy for growth and jobs laid down objectives to mitigate the effects of population ageing in the field of employment. The pact on immigration and asylum is subject to an intense European debate.

    The regions share common demographic trends of large family sizes, agrarian lifestyles, and low income levels. The patterns of an economy based on agricultural production and mineral extractive activities as well as disruptive changes in political leadership are common throughout the continent. Demographics are the statistical study of human population. Demographic data typically includes population size, population density and characteristics that describe the composition of the population.

    Rethinking population ageing in the SDG era According to World Population Prospects (United Nations, ), by , 1 in 6 people in the world will be over the age of 65, up from 1 in 11 in Population Trends. Follow the RSS feed for this page: Displaying of results ← Prev Page. You are reading page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page Next Page → Refine Your Results. L St. NW, Suite Washington, DC USA (+1) | Main (+1) | Fax.


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Demographic Trends in the European Region (WHO Regional Publications, European) by R.L. Cliquet Download PDF EPUB FB2

Demographic trends in EU regions. SUMMARY. The European Union has seen its population grow substantially – by around a quarter in the five and a half decades since – to a current level of over million people. However, this population is now growing too slowly, and is even expected to decline in the longer term.

Demographic change in Europe and its health and social implications: an overview / A.D. Lopez --Part 2, Recent demographic trends in the European region. Trends and perspectives in family formation / L. Herberger ; Trends and perspectives in fertility / A. Klinger ; Trends and perspectives in mortality / E.

Lynge -- Part 3, Health and social. Demographic trends in EU regions. The European Union has seen its population grow substantially – by around a quarter in the five and a half decades since – to a current level of over million people.

However, this population is now growing too. Demographic trends in EU regions - EP briefing All EU regions are affected by demographic impacts, such as the ageing of the population driven by longer life-spans and low levels of fertility, yet some – especially remote, rural and/or border regions that face massive depopulation – experience these impacts much more strongly than others.

31/01/ Demographic developments have various implications for European regions. Some of them, especially rural and remote ones, are experiencing a considerable decline in population numbers.

This situation may further exacerbate the economic decline regions are already facing, and thereby widen the gap between wealthy and poor ones.

Demographic developments have various implications for European regions. Some of them, especially rural and remote ones, are experiencing a considerable decline in population numbers.

This situation may further exacerbate the economic decline regions are already facing, and thereby widen the gap between wealthy and poor ones. It was on the basis of long-running observations of demographic trends and population reproduction in European countries that the concept of “demographic revolution” or “demographic transition” was first developed (Rabinowicz, ; Landry, ).

[1] [1] The expression “demographic revolution” was first used by Léon. Demographic trends, statistics and data on ageing. On the one hand, the population of the European Region is projected to increase only slightly by – from million to million – but then to return to current levels by On the other hand, the number of working-age people is expected to decline steadily and the number of older people to increase, leading to an increase in the old-age dependency.

Trends and projected trends (medium variant) in average annual rate of population change by European Region 2 The public health impact of changing demography in Europe The modelling available that was used indicates that the future population of Europe is likely to shrink and this will impact European countries to different extents.

The observation of demographic trends at the NUTS2 and NUTS3 levels between and reveals demographic decline across large parts of Central and Eastern Europe, and especially in the Baltic States, in Bulgaria and Romania, eastern German Länder, Slovakia and Croatia.

For example, in our Medium scenario the percentage of those aged 65 and more increases from around 8% in to 20% by In the European Union, the share of older people will grow from around 20% in to 32% in according to medium scenario.

In half of the population in this region will be at an age of at least 50 years. Europe has the most studied and best documented population of all the world’s regions. It was on the basis of long-running observations of demographic trends and population reproduction in European countries that the concept of “demographic revolution” or “demographic transition” was fi rst developed (Rabinowicz, ; Landry, ).

Current demographic trends raise new questions, challenges and controversies. Comparing demographic trends in Europe and the NAME-region (North Africa and the Middle East), this book demonstrates how population change interacts with changing economic landscapes, social distinctions and political realities.

The book presents a comprehensive overview of the recent demographic trends in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe focusing on such critical issues as fertility decline, changes in mortality, migration dynamics, acceleration of population ageing and negative population growth.

I – Population change 1The population of Europe (including the Caucasian successor republics of the former USSR) stood at million on 1 January – almost 3 million more than on 1 January Despite this apparent rise, which partly reflects adjustments made after the most recent wave of censuses, the continent’s population has remained broadly unchanged since the early s.

Within the EU there is a clear trend of younger people leaving Europe’s south, especially from rural areas, in search of work in the job-rich northwest. Between andRomania, Lithuania, Greece, and Portugal all saw their median ages increase by more than four years. The population density in Europe is 34 people per Km 2 (87 people per mi 2), calculated on a total land area of 22, Km2 (8, sq.

miles). See also Population of Europe. Rationale Justification for indicator selection. Trends in the size and structure of human population play a key role in the environmental impact of countries and regions (UN, a).Demographic trends strongly influence economic activities, which in turn determine demands on ecosystems and levels of pollution (UNFPA, ).Consequently, trends in population size and structure may provide an.

Figures for the population of Europe vary according to the particular definition of Europe's ing to the United Nations, the population within the standard physical geographical boundaries comprised million in In the population was million, [citation needed] defining Europe's boundaries as the continental divides of the Caucasus and Ural mountains and the.

The median age in Europe is 43, 12 years older than the rest of the world. The trend will become more pronounced from when Europe’s population is forecast by the UN to start shrinking. The. At the other end of the range, there were 16 NUTS level 3 regions where the population declined by more than per 1 inhabitants inthey were located exclusively in eastern Europe and the Baltic Member States, with the biggest reduction in the easternmost Croatian region of Vukovarsko-srijemska županija ( per 1 History of Europe - History of Europe - The emergence of modern Europe, – The 16th century was a period of vigorous economic expansion.

This expansion in turn played a major role in the many other transformations—social, political, and cultural—of the early modern age.

By the population in most areas of Europe was increasing after two centuries of decline or stagnation.Medieval demography is the study of human demography in Europe and the Mediterranean during the Middle estimates and seeks to explain the number of people who were alive during the Medieval period, population trends, life expectancy, family structure, and related issues.